No longer

I am reverting this blog back to . This reflects my poor posting habits here. The simple fact is that I am no longer identifying as pagan. I am a humanist, with pagan leanings.

I will maintain this wordpress site as a resource for anyone interested in paganism.

Blessed Be!

A Year’s Wrap Up

Well guys, it’s been a year. As usual, I wrote for a while and then trailed off as other things became more important. I started this blog when I was 19, and am now entering my 27th year. I’ve had some ups and downs, and plenty of learning experiences. Friends and family have fallen along the way, but I’ve kept trudging along. Enough of the dramatics, let’s talk about what I did this year to better myself.

1. Atheism

Yes, this blog is called Pagan Pages. And yes, I am an atheist. There are actually quite a few of us out there — those of us who still participate in pagan traditions and rituals without attributing experiences to the supernatural. The most important, real side-effect of my atheism has been a change in my attitude. My mantra has become:

I have one life to live. I better make it good.

And the choices I make now more accurately reflect the values that I want to live by. For example, I have donated hundreds of dollars of belongings to thrift stores that support public and mental health programs in the area, I gave some to an animal shelter that was vandalized, I rescued two dogs and found them homes, and brought a rescue cat into my own home. During Christmas, I was able to give a new tablet to a patient with cystic fibrosis, and I have some blankets and coats that I’m planning to take to a women’s shelter soon. My desire to help those around me is now being put into action, instead of just thoughts.

2. Disease management

Last winter, I took the plunge and finally saw a migraine specialist. He gave me a very simple treatment plan that I’ve been adhering to. My migraines are well managed now and I no longer worry that I’m going insane or have a secret brain tumor. I have strategies to cope with breakthrough headaches and ways to minimize episodes.

This winter, I realized that I needed to do something about my seasonal affective depression. Self-diagnosed, of course, but when you can’t crawl out of bed through most of October, it’s a problem. So I got a SAD light and some Vitamin D. The combo works. Do it. You won’t regret it.

3. Physical health and well-being

I’ve lost 37 pounds this year, taking me out of “Obese” — where I’ve been for the last decade — and into “Overweight.” I am at my high school weight. I plan to lose 60 total and then re-evaluate. No, I don’t have before and after’s. But I’ve started weightlifting, and I’ve gone from 18 to 12/14 (pants) and XL to M/L (shirts). I used myfitnesspal to track calories, and focused on eating reasonable amounts. I stopped drinking so much soda. No fake sugar (it’s a migraine trigger), and patience. Lots of patience. I can deadlift and squat over 100 lbs, bench and press over 60. That’s no small feat!

My turning point was when my OB/GYN told me that she didn’t want to watch me waste my life away in work and fail to take care of myself. I deeply respect her and took it to heart. Took me a few months to get over the criticism, but then I started to make changes.

That’s it for me, folks. What have you done this year? What will you do next year?

Finding Autonomy, Parts 1-3 (WALK)




(1) In the beginning, there was nothing. Not a single atom, nor a god, nor a sun, a moon, a cell. Nothing was infinitesimally packaged into this universe. Nothing was this universe.

(5) Then came a day when there was something. Nothing exploded into matter and still expands to this day. And although the universe stretches far beyond human imagination, the universe is not our current concern.

(8) All solutions must first have a problem. I do not wax omniscient about your problems, but instead offer the solution. I have found this solution works for all problems, because problems are never first physical.

(11) Sensations turn to perceptions turn to problems. And it is here, in perceptions, that we find the source of all problems. And here, in these words, I offer you the solution to your perceptions.

(14) Walk. If you cannot walk, move in some direction by your own decision. If you cannot move of your own free will, then imagine a walk, a perpetual, decisive motion. And it is here, in this walking temple, that you will find the answers to your problems.



(1) Your perceptions are the source of all problems. Those who do not think, do not worry. Much of human life is worry. And although other beings are not as cognizant, they too, worry. Without worry, there would be no survival.

(5) Worry must not rule your heart and mind. Deep inside, we all recognize our autonomy. Though we are ruled by law and order, none can rule our minds but us. Chains on our feet are not chains on our hearts.

(9) Worry has its place, but its place is not at your head or in your heart. Worry is your counselor, not your master. Remember your autonomy. Control your movement. Be one with your physical body, and your mind will quiet.

(14) Walk. And while you walk, challenge your heart to know itself in the deepest way. Do not love unwilling, do not know with a blind faith. Control your worry, and you will have peace.



(1) All hide in familiarity. Be it a song or smile or route, we find solace in the perceived fallacy of sameness. Yet, everything we see changes, and everything we hear will never be heard again. Although the message stays the same, the delivery will change, and our perception of its meaning will rise anew each time.

(5) To remember the wisdom of “Walk.” is opportunity to learn your lessons anew. To bring to heart new meanings and discoveries and decisions. To find your way through the darkness and into your light.

(8) Take this opportunity in the morning and in the night. In the high sun and in total darkness. Shod and unshod, clothed and naked, stand before yourself and inquire with an unfettered mind. What makes you? What makes me? What makes the universe?

(14) Walk. And while you walk, open your heart to all things. Challenge your atheism and your faith alike. Emerge from the fire as a new being each day.

Rites of Passage

I’ll never forget reading a book about rites of passage in one of my college classes.
The entire class, in fact, was about rituals and rites and how we humans make sense of the world.  I read about some more culturally disturbing rituals, in which young men are required to “take their elder’s seed” into their mouths to receive the knowledge and strength of their elders (they perform oral sex on their fathers, uncles, and grandfathers).  But overall, the threads of that class — how a ritual is structured, the purpose of a ritual, and all of those things — I see them running through my daily life.

I witnessed a Ph.D. defense yesterday.  Well, the public part. They do the actual defense in private, but I had an opportunity to watch him tell a room full of people about his research. Although much like a normal presentation, an oral dissertation presentation has an additional layer of both nerves and giddiness. It’s not uncommon to hear jokes intended to up the ante, like, “We’ll leave all the questions to your committee,” or, “I’m sure they’ll talk about that later.”

Rites of passage are all around us.  From the training videos at national corporations like Target and McDonalds to the elaborate customs and decorations involved in handfastings and weddings, there are often symbols tied up in our everyday activities.

This line of argumentation or description may be helpful to you in your encounters with the non-pagan world. One of the more common arguments from others is that magic isn’t real, or even worse, magic is evil. Magic, if you remember, is the simple act of demanding change from the world. Any time that someone declares “I do” or “I will” in response to a question or statement, they are engaging in magic. From the court room to the DMV, magic and rituals are all around us. Pagans should not be demonized for calling what they do, what it is. The only difference is that the rituals associated with paganism are less common than the rituals associated with church on Sunday.

Advocating for a friend

Hi everyone –

We can’t all be JUST pagan all the time. We’re so much more than our religions, although they may certainly drive us towards certain lifestyles. As such, although this is a blog about pagan stuff, I wanted to share my friend’s endeavor with you. My friend is a scientist who’s trying to get some crowd-funding for her research project, to finish her Ph.D, and save a rare butterfly. If you can, please give her video (below) a watch, and if you’re interested, please donate. Every little bit, even just $5, can help her help these butterflies.

Brightest Blessings,


Reiki is no religion: Learning Reiki and its value system

Some people, probably not Pagan, tend to shy away from energy healing systems like Reiki because they’re afraid that it’s a religion, not a spiritual practice. If they dig a little deeper, however, they’ll find that they are mistaken.

Reiki operates on a simple principle: Healing energy goes where it’s permitted to go. Under this model, anyone can become a Reiki practitioner. A Reiki practitioner is anyone who has the skills to direct the energy, and who has access to the energy. Reiki has a long history of attunement: every Reiki practitioner can trace their “attunement lineage” back to Mikai Usuo, the founder or “discoverer” of Reiki energy.

The story goes that Usuo discovered the energy while meditating and, along with it, found several symbols meant to “unlock” access and attune others. The symbols help you send energy to a person, even across distance, and also “unlock” someone else so that they, too, can access the energy. 

I was initiated into Reiki sometime in 2008 and became a Reiki master in 2009. I do use it, occasionally, but as part of my push to raise funds for running this and other websites, I’ve begun to offer a Reiki healing service through Fiverr. For just $5, you can get a distance healing session along with free attunement to Reiki and a manual explaining how to use your new energy.

So why is Reiki not a religion? Because Reiki practitioners have one motive: heal. There is no supernatural being involved except in the pantheistic sense of the Universe being sacred and powerful. There is no homage to a specific god, be it Japanese or Judeo-Christian, nor is there an emphasis on theism in order for Reiki to work.

So, even if you’re a little weirded out by energy healing practices, I encourage you to give Reiki a try. The feeling of someone caring for you, if nothing else, is a great way to spend a few minutes. Unlike chakra alignment and other energy healing practices, Reiki has no dogma attached to it other than “Feel better! Now!” 

Personalized Tarot Card Readings

It’s been a long time since I’ve picked up my tarot card deck, but I feel like they have something to tell me.  That, and, let’s face it, divination is always a great skill to develop.

I’m doing two things with my tarot card deck this month (March), and I want you to know about them.  First, I am offering tarot card readings for only $5 exclusively through .  All proceeds go to this site’s maintenance and development, so if you have some money to spare, be sure to check it out.

Second, I am developing a class on tarot cards.  This class, when ready, will also debut through Fiverr.  I’ve prepared the first section, a 10-minute audio podcast on seven different tarot card spreads as well as the basic structure for conducting a tarot card reading.  The other planned sections are a section for each arcana, the meanings of each number / card identity, and some sample tarot readings.

Do you have any thoughts about the class or the readings? Any advice?  I want to make tarot reachable for EVERY one.  We all know my stance on the mystical, and how I’m not-so-secretly a Wiccan Atheist, but I think there’s value in tarot because it lends a meditative quality to everyday problems and also activates the creative centers of our brains.

Enjoy your Friday!