Dying Alone

I know its a weird way to start my actually-here posts, but I returned from my trip to find my leopard gecko had passed away.  Caleb had been doing bad for quite some time, and I think it may have been my fault.  I always gave him food and water, but I think that while I was away at college, though my family gave him the same materials, they did not give him any attention.  I know they never took him out and held him or interacted with him.

As a result, I think my gecko, in part, died because of lack of interaction.  It may have also been his time – he was a rather old gecko.  But leopard geckos are the worst when they get old, because they just stop eating (or all of the ones I have had, have).  They’re desert animals, so it takes forever for them to die.

I cried today.  Not necessarily because of the death of my gecko, because everything has a time to go, but more because the poor creature had to die alone.  I think to an extent that all creatures are as scared of death as we are, although it may resurface and rework itself in many different ways.

Along the bike trip, throughout the day, we would pass by on the roads various roadkill.  From birds (I think there was a hawk at one point) to deer to groundhogs and squirrels, the roadkill we passed counted as objects to avoid riding over.  As a result, our trail markers often marked the area around them – drawing a flourescent pink circle around them (that was the color of the trail paint) – and one particular volunteer would place mardi gras beads on top of them.

It was meant as something to make the riders smile, but it also held a solemn note – we were saying goodbye to the deaths that no one was close enough to, to realize, to mourn, to recognize.

The entire earth is a community.  I don’t mean to make us all cry every day for the many, many animals, plants and other organisms alike that pass on, but an occasional moment of solemn awareness, a recognition of the gravity and importance of death, is a good way to start.

My high priest once knew a woman who would go out and draw or photograph roadkill.  Then she would name it, frame it, or in some other way categorize it.  I think that’s taking it a little too far.  But if no one notices the dead, how are we supposed to truly appreciate the living?

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Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time

Hey guys –

No worries. I may have mentioned that my bicycling trip from Buffalo to Albany is taking place soon (As in, I leave tomorrow) but there shouldn’t be a lack of posting. I’m going to set my friend up to post on my behalf pre-written things to keep you all entertained while I work my butt off over 400 miles of New York. I believe it is going to be a top ten list, as I will be gone starting tomorrow, the fifth, and won’t return until July 13th. With that in mind, here is the first of my completely arbitrary, just now composed list of the Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time.

Number 10: Cleansing is not the “Cure All”

I know that we’ve all had our days where everything has just gone wrong. Where no matter what you do, even the simple acts of grounding and centering yourself seem forced, if you can do them at all. The people in your life are grouchy, you can’t seem to get yourself out of a hole you’ve dug, and all you want to do is start over.

I know what ails you: Life. And let me tell you, from at least my experience, cleansing is not a cure all. What I’ve found, at least, is that the actual act of cleansing is a great idea – as long as the space is entirely your own. But when you cleanse something else – say, a shared dorm room – you may find that things only get worse.

Just a theory of mine, and it may not be shared by others, but I think that when you cleanse something that is not yours, you put your footprint on it. And with that footprint comes your sudden ability to heft the karma of that particular space onto your own shoulders. And suddenly, you’re feeling the urge to drink if your roommate is an alcoholic, or the urge to bitch if your shared office space is used to voice complaints in.

Sometimes, the best you can do is ride the waves. We, as witches, are supposed to be masters of our own reality, able to pick and choose where we want to walk. But, it’s a work in progress. Perhaps a cleansing followed by physical steps taken to remove the ill – a talk with your roommate or coworker – may better serve to fix the problem. After all, if all we hand to do was sprinkle some salt and water, and cense some incense around to fix all of our problems, let’s face it: Life would be no fun.

Number One of the Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time « Pagan Pages.

Number Two of the Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time « Pagan Pages.

Number Three of the Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time « Pagan Pages.

Number Four of the Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time « Pagan Pages.

Number Five of the Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time « Pagan Pages.

Number Six of the Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time « Pagan Pages.

Number Seven of the Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time « Pagan Pages.

Number Eight of the Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time « Pagan Pages.

Number Nine of the Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time « Pagan Pages.

Top Ten Things A Witch Learns Over Time « Pagan Pages.